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    Workshops on sustainability and BCA

    Australian Building Codes Board

    More than 100 government representatives, building designers, engineers, planners, researchers and building surveyors will attend workshops being held around Australia during December and January to discuss whether sustainability measures should be incorporated into the future Building Code of Australia.

    The workshops are being conducted as part of research by the Cooperative Research Centre for Construction Innovation (CRC CI) and CRC CI partner, the Australian Building Codes Board (ABCB).

    “The workshops offer a great opportunity for delegates to find about the research we’re doing and to debate whether sustainability should be considered in the Building Code of Australia,” said the Chief Executive Officer for the CRC CI, Dr Keith Hampson.

    The building control authorities in each state and territory are organising the workshops in conjunction with the ABCB. The workshops will be held in Perth, Darwin, Hobart, Adelaide, Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Canberra. Key stakeholders in the building industry will be invited to attend.

    The workshops will be addressed by the project’s chief researcher, Dr Lam Pham of CSIRO. Dr Pham said Stage One of the research had recently been completed.

    “Our research to date has consisted of a review of literature on national and international ecological sustainable development principles and objectives within national, state and local building regulations."

    “The workshops will provide a forum for an exchange of information and ideas between the researchers and workshop delegates on the role of regulation in ecologically sustainable development,” Dr Pham said.

    The research commenced in January 2002 and will be completed in January 2003.

    A number of other CRC CI partners are also participating in the research including Arup Australasia, the Building Commission of Victoria, CSIRO, Queensland Department of Public Works and Queensland University of Technology. Environment Australia is also involved.

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