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    Lessons in resilience: what city planners can learn from Hobart's floods
    Lessons in resilience: what city planners can learn from Hobart's floods

    Hobart is a city known for its risk of catastrophic fire, such as the devastating wildfires of 1897-98 and 1967. As the second-driest city in Australia, until last week it was easy to forget that Hobart is also vulnerable to serious flooding.


    Long-running battle ends in a win for residents, koalas and local council planning rules
    Long-running battle ends in a win for residents, koalas and local council planning rules

    Gold Coast City Council has won a four-year legal battle with Boral Resources, with the courts upholding the council’s refusal to approve a proposed quarry because of its impacts on the amenity of local residents – including the area’s koalas.


    Making the connection between lighting and design clearer
    Making the connection between lighting and design clearer

    Dr Tim Shotbolt, Gerard Lighting’s senior lighting designer explains how lighting and lighting technology are important to the design of each and every structure and what role they play in the sustainability of our built environment.


    What was missing in Australia's $1.9 billion infrastructure announcement
    What was missing in Australia's $1.9 billion infrastructure announcement

    There’s a whole set of infrastructure that rarely gets mentioned or noticed: “soft” infrastructure. These are the services, policies or practices that keep academic research working and, now, open.


    Homelessness: Australia's shameful story of policy complacency and failure continues
    Homelessness: Australia's shameful story of policy complacency and failure continues

    Exactly a decade ago in 2008, the Australian government committed to an ambitious strategy to halve national homelessness by 2020. However, as succeeding governments regrettably abandoned the 2008 strategy, homelessness in Australia has been on the rise.


    Let's get moving with the affordable medium-speed alternatives to the old dream of high-speed rail
    Let's get moving with the affordable medium-speed alternatives to the old dream of high-speed rail

    More than half a century has passed since high-speed rail began operating in Japan. Meanwhile, the Australian Federal Government is less interested in high-speed rail and instead favours "faster rail" or medium-speed rail.


    Sydney's Chinatown is much more of a modern bridge to Asia than a historic enclave
    Sydney's Chinatown is much more of a modern bridge to Asia than a historic enclave

    Rather than a relic of the past, Sydney’s Chinatown is a precinct where Australia’s increasing entanglement with Asia can be seen in the streets. It has morphed into a vibrant powerhouse of Asian-Australian urban modernity and consumer culture.


    Why the need for speed? Transport spending priorities leave city residents worse off
    Why the need for speed? Transport spending priorities leave city residents worse off

    Australian governments are set to spend more on transport infrastructure than ever before. But will all this construction make it easier for us to get around, our journeys more enjoyable, or our cities more liveable for a growing population?


    Passive Solar Design vs Passive House
    Passive Solar Design vs Passive House

    Passive House (or PassivHaus to our European cousins) is taking off in a big way in Australia but what it is and how is it different to Passive Design or Passive Solar Design?


    Air pollution increases crime in cities – here's how
    Air pollution increases crime in cities – here's how

    There is growing evidence to suggest that air pollution does not just affect our health – it affects our behaviour too.


    Indigenous communities are reworking urban planning, but planners need to accept their history
    Indigenous communities are reworking urban planning, but planners need to accept their history

    Today, Indigenous people continue to be seen as “out of place” in the city. Their rights and interests remain largely invisible in urban history, policy and planning practice.


    Children living in green neighbourhoods are less likely to develop asthma
    Children living in green neighbourhoods are less likely to develop asthma

    Since the pioneering work of architecture professor Roger Ulrich, who found that patients with a view of a natural scene recovered more quickly from surgery, research has shown that exposure to the natural environment is associated with a wide range of health benefits.


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