When it comes to your kitchen, one of the most important items in your design should be the splashback.

Splashbacks are a functional alternative to traditional kitchen wall tiles. In most cases they are places where you would normally tile the walls behind your benchtops. So regardless if it's an acrylic or glass splashback, it will prevent water from destroying your walls.

Some current trends of kitchen splashbacks include; Glass window splashbacks, rustic timber, raw texture and single stone slab, yet ceramic  and porcelain are atypically the most common choice of kitchen splashback. Many of the aforementioned spashback products are available from stores like Bunnings and Mitre 10, which are popular retailers Australia gets their tiles from, or more of the above trends mentioned can be found here.

There are several tile materials to choose from; glass, ceramic, porcelain, marble, granite and even metal. One big factor in deciding which of the best tile material to go for, is whether it is cheap or not. If you are on a budget, the best options include porcelain and ceramic. If you are able and willing to spend a bit more, you might want to consider more expensive options such as marble, granite, and glass.

The issue of style is not as important nowadays when choosing between various tile materials. Thanks to technology, alternatives to costly options like ceramic tiles, can even be designed to resemble marble or even a metal surface. This is beneficial when you want a specific look but at a cheaper price.

Depending on the colour and opacity of the splashback, this will vary in maintenance for the appearance or cleanliness of it. Similarly, the material will determine the colour,  and with that being said, is fairly open to preference of the individual. Thanks to modern technology, almost any colour can be achieved depending on the material.

Again, depending on the splashback you choose, its maintenance may be different to let's say, acrylic or toughened glass. Both surface-level maintenance and replacements will vary.

Shape
If you prefer the look of a plain-tiled splashback without any pattern or bold colouring, you can still add some interest by playing around with shapes. Choosing a plain-coloured geometric tile is a great way to create a subtle feature, and are typically easier to lay/set in. This can be anywhere from diagonally, square-shaped or a hexagon tile to pentagonal. Just remember that shape will determine installation ease, or lack thereof.

Layout
If you love subway tiles but fancy adding a bit of a twist, lay them in a herringbone pattern. Use a grey or black grout instead of white to further accentuate the shape of the tiles and the pattern.

Cost

  1. $35 and $250 per square metre depending on the type of tiles
  2. $230 per square metre for laminate
  3. $247 per square metre for acrylic
  4. $300 to $350 per square metre for Metaline®
  5. $330 per square metre for painted clear glass
  6. $330 per square metre for satin finish stainless steel (3.0mm)
  7. $390 per square meter for engineered stone
  8. $420 per square metre for painted starfire glass

You can expect to pay anywhere from $300 to $800 for installation - depending on the complexity of your job and the number of cut-outs you splashback requires.

Cut-outs are mainly for powerpoints and will cost anywhere from $50 each or more depending on the material.

As you can see above, glass is one of the more expensive options, and higher maintenance overall. Be sure to research your desired material before finalising your decision.

Also be aware of a number of issues when buying kicthen splashback tiles such as style (herringbone), material (marble), size (large), style (modern), shape (square), pattern (textured), colour (white), grout (black grout), price (cheap) to ensure you get the best for your project.

But most importantly, this is not a DIY-friendly project, hire a professional to install your splashback.

So, the 19 best splashback ideas with accompanying images are:

1. Wood Panelled Splashback

Using a timber panelled splashback. Versatile in design, timber splashbacks compliment both light and dark cabinetry and bench tops. 

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

2. Geometric Splashback

A geometric pattered splashback. Muted colour palettes such as teal, grey and white will help to downplay the boldness of this pattern.  

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

3. Distressed Mirror Splashback

For a vintage style kitchen where this distressed mirror splashback will suit this style.

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

4. Pressed Metal Splashback

Also known as a textured splashback, this pressed metal motif adds an interesting dynamic to a polished kitchen layout. 

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

5. Red Splashback

So red, so now! Lift the colour palette of your kitchen with this stunning red splashback. 

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

6. Window Splashback

Show me the light! Bring natural lighting into your kitchen with a window splashback and enjoy meal preparation with a view.  

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

7. Textured Glass Splashback

Glass splashbacks will give your kitchen a refined elegance and a strong focal point within any modern kitchen. 

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

8. Textured Black Matte Splashback

So hot right now! Edgy and bold, a black textured splashback will create a dramatic framing for your cabinetry. 

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

9. Wavy Textured Splashback

This wavy splashback has an emphasis on clean lines and structure, making it a perfect choice for all modern and minimalist kitchens. 

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

10. Oxidized Brass Splashback

Teamed with bold copper light fixtures and stainless steel bench tops, this splashback idea will redefine the term urban kitchen.  

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

11. Glossy Subway Tile Splashback

These subway-style tiles will give any new kitchen a classic air and allow for versatility and style to boot.

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

12. Speckled Glass Splashback

The fine speckled pattern has a modern look and feel and compliments many textured surfaces like marble and Caesarstone. 

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

13. Copper Kitchen Splashback

Modern interior designers these days just can't get enough of a rose gold feature.

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

14. Stone kitchen splashback wall

A stone wall adds visual interest and texture to a white kitchen and also it’s easy to wipe down while also giving a modern edge to your space.

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

15. Arabesque tiles

Add a touch of elegance to your new kitchen splashback with these lantern-shaped white tiles.

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

16. Chevron tiles

Take a twist on the classic white chevron tiles by choosing a pretty pink tile. Layer it from bench to ceiling to create a kitchen splashback that makes a bold and stunning statement.

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

17. Black glass splashback

This glossy black splashback brings a striking dimension to any kitchen. While it is beautiful, be warned – you will have to stay on top of the cleaning to keep it shiny and sparkling.

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

18. Diamond tiles

These white diamond tiles add the perfect choice if you’re wanting to make a statement without going too bold.

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

19. Herringbone tiles

The Herringbone pattern has been so popular for decades and it’s made its way on to home walls and is a classic choice for a striking kitchen splashback.

So, a splashback is better than tiles. Even if the grout in tiles will start to stain over time, a splashback will remain a smooth and easily cleaned surface.

How to install a splashback:

According to a Bellissi, always ensure your walls are clean, dry, smooth and free from any foreign materials.

All backing substrates should be flush with no lipping or steps across different sheets.

Where you have loose tiles remove completely and fill void with an appropriate filler. Clean all tiles thoroughly with a grease removing cleaner like sugar soap to remove any contaminates. Extremely high gloss tiles may need to be scuffed with coarse sandpaper to ensure correct adhesion with your silicone (see silicone manufacturers recommendations).

A suggestion is when installing multiple panels determine where your joins will be and identify the area that may be visible between these joins with your marker.

Once you have completed all preparation and cutting don’t forget to remove the protective film on the back (painted) side of your panel before adhering to your wall Always leave the front protective film on the front of your panel until the very last. This should be the last job after you have cleaned up your construction site. When pushing your panel against a wall use a straight edge as this will ensure you have a nice flat installation rather than one that follows the contour of an uneven wall.

Use the packaging your panel came in to make up a template for cutting your sheet. Use tile spacers to give you the correct spacing between sheets and your bench top.

Masking tape on the painted back of your sheet where a hole is to be drilled can help prevent starring and damaging the paint.

You can use small pieces of double-sided tape to hold your panel in place while your silicone cures.

Remove the protection film on the front of the panel in one move to get the best result.

Cost of Splashback tiles

According to Domain, expect to pay anywhere between $45 and $250 per square metre for the tiles only, depending on the material the tiles are made from, the colour or pattern, the size of the tile, plus the adhesive and grout.

A tiler will charge you approximately $400 to tile a kitchen splashback in an average size kitchen. If you fancy a bit of DIY, you can save on the labour cost by doing the tiling yourself.

Information from https://www.airtasker.com/blog/kitchen-splashback-ideas/

https://renoguide.com.au/kitchen/sensational-kitchen-splashbacks