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    Peak industry body for Australian water services industry

    Water Services Association of Australia

    The Water Services Association of Australia (WSAA) supports all those involved in the water services industry and brings them together based on their common interest.

    Members are responsible for providing water and sewerage services to over 16 million Australians as well as some of the country’s largest companies and industries.

    The association is recognised as the water industry’s representative body, and works to ensure that it has a strong, unified voice.

    Key decision makers often seek the association’s assistance and input when developing and amending policy related to the water services industry, and it thus plays an important role in this process.

    Since its inception in 1998 the association has developed strong relationships with policy makers, legislative bodies and their influencers in order to ensure such policies account for and benefit the water services industry.

    The association operates as a forum for its members, providing them with the opportunity to meet and discuss issues affecting the water services industry as well as share information and research findings.

    Industry events and seminars are also regularly organised in an attempt to bring the association’s members, the broader water services industry, levels of government and the community together.

    In order to ensure members provide customers, stakeholders and the community  with the best possible services the association researchers and reports on the water industry's performance on a regular basis.

    The association offers two membership types:

    • Full membership – for public or private agencies or utilities who provide water and/or sewerage services, and bulk water suppliers and sewerage treatment operators who provide services to agencies or utilities.
    • Associate membership – for companies or organisations interested in the water services industry. 
    Photo: a Creative Commons (Attribution 2.0) image from Michael Scott’s Flickr photo stream

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