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    Tontine supplies thermal batts for Cranbourne East P-12 School

    Tontine™ Insulation

    Thermal batts from Tontine™ Insulation were supplied to the new Cranbourne East P-12 School, one of 11 schools being built in Melbourne’s West, South and North under the PPP (Public Private Partnership) in Schools Project undertaken by Partnerships Victoria.

    The Cranbourne East P-12 School is set to bring together the best in contemporary educational design and promote active student-centred learning through the creation of flexible and functional spaces. The school has been designed to lead by example in ecological sustainability.

    Cranbourne East P-12 School needed a high-performing thermal insulation, which would allow the project to meet strict Government 5-Star Energy Ratings as well as follow best green building practice.

    The client also specified an easy-to-use product that would be 100% safe for personnel to work with during installation.

    Tontine insulation contains no harmful VOCs or formaldehyde, uses no chemicals in the manufacturing process and is 100% recyclable. Tontine insulation does not require any special protective gear for installation and is made from the same material found in polyester quilts and pillows.

    Tontine polyester insulation was able to meet the requirements of the client for high performing insulation while addressing environmental and workplace safety concerns. Tontine thermal batts (R2.0) were installed by contractor Axiom for the builder, Abigroup.

    Key features of Tontine thermal batts R2.0:

    • Lightweight insulation manufactured from thermally bonded polyester fibre
    • Minimum 83% recycled fibre content
    • Complies with AS/NZ 4859.1
    • Non-toxic and user-friendly, requiring no specific protective clothing
    • Will not corrode or deteriorate over time
    • Provides efficient acoustic insulation properties
    • Ideal for use in walls, ceilings and sub-floors
    • Improves energy efficiency and reduces greenhouse gas emissions

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