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    Shipping container mansion outperforms Queenslander and spec homes, says architect [Video]

    Nathan Johnson

    ‘Cargotecture’ reaches new heights with this Brisbane mansion by Zeigler Build, which is comprised of 31 shipping containers and delivered over three massive levels.

    Todd Miller of Zeigler Build designed and built the home and speaks of its insulation, natural lighting, structure and finishes with an immersed confidence.

    “The building will outperform any Queenslander or any spec home in Australia,” he claims.

    Spread over three levels, Miller explains via a YouTube video (see below) that the design used tinted ‘E glass’ and open spaces to maximise natural light that could be lost in a container dominated build.

    In terms of structural integrity Miller suggests that although unnecessary, his project utilises brand new rather than recycled containers. Massive 250uv structural beams also run throughout the building and have given Miller the confidence to offer a lifetime engineering guarantee to the project.

    “This particular house –engineering wise—has a lifetime guarantee,” he said.

    “The foundations of this product are nine metres in depth so they’re micro-piles; normal foundations are 1200mm, so this thing is going nowhere.”

    Timber finishes feature throughout the home and contrast with the more robust container surfaces. These include wooden decks and soffits, bamboo floor boards, a timber garage door and perforated Tasmanian oak acoustic boards.

    The home has four bedrooms, a mezzanine reading room, a rumpus room, an art study, workshop, gym space, water tank and saltwater pool.

    The above two levels are insulated to Australian standards via wool batts and polystyrene panels. Miller believes that when combined with his design elements, such as the buildings air vortex, the building is insulated enough to forego air conditioning.

    The home’s thermal performance is also helped by the Intracool exterior coating from Dulux which gives the shipping containers a reflective rubber membrane.

    The design also features reticulated rainwater tank that services toilets and showers.  

    Images: My Modern Met

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