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    Green Star projects endorsed in new CBRE report

    The Green Star building standard has been endorsed in a new CBRE report on the benefits of environmentally sensitive design in the industrial sector. The report used Green Star projects to illustrate how sustainable design could support a new generation of green industrial and logistics assets in Australia.

    Referring to the growing awareness of green design, CBRE Senior Research Manager Kate Bailey said more firms were seeing value in developing and retrofitting industrial buildings with a focus on environmentally sensitive design, improving operating costs and functionality.

    Bailey added that the rapid take up of the Green Star building standard across the commercial property sector is a reflection of the significant benefits offered to both building owners and tenants – and the huge potential currently untapped in the industrial and logistics sector.

    Dexus Head of Industrial Development, Chris Mackenzie, said the increase in more environmentally-focused industrial assets was driven by greater tenant emphasis on workplace and operational efficiency.

    In response, Dexus is integrating their customers’ operations into the design while focusing upon achieving operational savings through Green Star ratings and the integration of environmentally sustainable outcomes.

    Dexus’ 5 star Green Star Laverton North facility in Melbourne incorporates a number of environmentally sustainable design initiatives such as solar panels, translucent roof sheeting, LED sensor lighting and strategic window placement for maximum light penetration during winter for natural heating.

    Similarly, the Horsley Drive Business Park in Sydney’s Wetherill Park is set to be the first 6 star Green Star industrial asset in Australia. 

    Enumerating the benefits of green design, the report reveals that Green Star rated buildings use 66% less electricity than average buildings; produce 62% fewer greenhouse gas emissions; use 51% less potable water and recycle 96% of their waste.

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