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    BEMP forum brings political and industry leaders together to discuss development issues in WA

    The Built Environment Meets Parliament (BEMP) forum recently brought a host of political and industry leaders together to discuss economic, social and governance issues impacting Western Australia.

    Media identity James Lush facilitated an engaging discussion between the audience and panellists that touched on a range of issues including Perth’s identity, developing a clear vision for the future, transport infrastructure and building sustainable, liveable communities.

    GraMan Institute CEO and BEMP panellist John Daley observed that many of the current challenges faced by Perth were the same as those in other large cities in Australia and around the developed world. He explained that Perth’s challenges weren’t unique; for instance, job growth in many large cities around the world was focussed on the city centre while new housing was being created on the fringes.

    According to the Hon John Day, Minister for Planning; Culture and the Arts, one of the greatest challenges is meeting the needs of Perth’s growing population in a manner that maintains its remarkable qualities. He said that the Government was responding to this challenge by making plans that will facilitate the delivery of increased housing density and diversity through high quality well located infill development. This will help accommodate a significant proportion of the city’s future population in existing urban areas.

    He added that the Government was also undertaking innovative development projects in partnership with the private sector that would help revitalise the underutilised parts of the city, including the Perth City Link.

    Initiating the forum for the first time in WA, host organisations, Australian Institute of Architects, Planning Institute of Australia and Green Building Council of Australia look forward to continuing the conversation between parliamentarians and industry leaders to help shape the future of the state.

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